MCRP + JD

 

The Planning Law dual degree supports the interests of students who wish to pursue study in the fields of both law and city and regional planning, provides a focal point for exploring the connections between the two disciplines through the research and instruction between the two programs; and provides an educational opportunity that reflects the fact that land management law and city and regional planning have become increasingly integrated and interdisciplinary in nature. The program promotes a broader educational experience for today’s land use law or planning professionals, by providing expertise in both disciplines.

The cooperative J.D./MCRP program will permit students to use credit hours earned in one program to satisfy some of the elective course requirements of the other program, thus permitting them to earn both degrees in a shorter time than would be possible pursuing both degrees separately.
 

Admissions

Candidates for the dual degree program will need to meet the separate admissions requirements of the College of Law and the School of City and Regional Planning.  Admission into one college will create no presumption favoring admission to the other.  To be admitted to the dual degree program, an applicant must be separately admitted to both the J.D. and the MCRP programs and then must request to proceed in the dual degree program. 

Students interested in the pursuing the dual degree program may apply for admission into the College of Law and the City and Regional Planning Program simultaneously, but they are not required to do so.  For students who are admitted first into the J.D. program, they should seek admission into the MCRP program as soon as possible and must be admitted into that program no later than the beginning of the fall semester of their third year of full-time law study.  For students who are admitted first into the MCRP program, they should seek admission into the J.D. program as soon as possible and must be admitted into that program no later than the beginning of the fall semester of their second year of full- time study as an MCRP student.

The College of Law will not permit a student to enroll in the dual degree program after the student has completed 31 hours of course work in the MCRP program.  Similarly, the City and Regional Planning will not permit a student to enroll in the dual degree program after the student has completed 65 hours of course work in the J.D. program. 

Students who have been admitted to both programs and intend to pursue the dual degree must, at their first opportunity, complete the first 31 semester hours of required courses in the J.D. program.  After the completion of these 31 hours of law courses, course enrollment in either program or both concurrently is permitted. 
 

Program Requirements

The College of Law requires all J.D. candidates to earn 90 credits hours, 43 of which are required courses and 47 of which are elective courses.  For students enrolled in the J.D./MCRP program, the College of Law will accept as course credit 12 semester hours earned from approved courses in the MCRP program.  Students must earn a grade of B or better to receive law credit for their MCRP course work.

All MCRP candidates are required to earn 55 credit hours, 29 of which are core course requirements, 12 of which are specialization requirements, and 14 of which are electives. For students enrolled in the J.D./MCRP program, the School of City and Regional Planning will accept as course credit a maximum of 21 semester hours from approved law courses in the J.D. program.  Students may use 6 of these law hours toward satisfying their MCRP specialization requirement, and apply the balance toward their electives.  To complete the dual degree, students must have a minimum of 18 semester hours of law courses.  Students must earn a grade of 80 (which is the equivalent of a B) or better to receive MCRP credit for their law course work.  If a student receives a grade of less than 80 for a required law course that will be used toward his/her MCRP degree, the student may petition the Program Director for this requirement to be waived.

The MCRP program requires students to earn 12 credit hours toward a planning specialization. Of particular interest to law students are the specializations in Environmental Planning or Land Use. These specializations are noted above in parenthesis next to the qualifying law courses. Students with interests in other planning specializations (land development/housing or transportation, for example) may propose other sets of law courses that would qualify as planning specialization courses. Approval of these alternate courses is needed from both law and planning coordinators.

Neither the J.D. nor the MCRP degree will be awarded until completion of the requirements of both degree programs.
 

Law courses that may count toward the MCRP :

Students can apply a minimum of 18 and a maximum of 21 hours of law courses toward their MCRP degree from the following list (other courses may be used, with permission of the program director):

  • Law 5050 Property I
  • Law 5051 Property II
  • Law 7010 Administrative Law 
  • Law 7060 Alternative Dispute Resolution (Environmental Planning)
  • Law 7117 Constitutional Law II: Individual Liberties (Land Use)
  • Law 7118 Constitutional Law: State Constitutions (Land Use)
  • Law 7196 Law and Economics
  • Law 7200 Environmental Law (Environmental Planning)
  • Law 7201 International Environmental Law (Environmental Planning)
  • Law 7202 Environmental Justice (Environmental Planning)
  • Law 7203 Natural Resources (Environmental Planning)
  • Law 7238 Law of Hazardous Waste (Environmental Planning)
  • Law 7244 Public Health Law
  • Law 7320 Land Use Law (Land Use)
  • Law 7375 Legislation
  • Law 7385 Local Government Law (Land Use)
  • Law 7433 Race, Ethnicity and the Law
  • Law 7435 Real Estate Transactions
  • Law 7437 Advanced Real Estate Transactions
  • Law 7500 Water Rights (Environmental Planning)
  • Law 8008 Alternative Dispute Resolution Externship (Environmental Planning)
  • Law 8100 Georgia DNR Externship (Environmental Planning)
  • Law 8120 Federal Environmental Law Externship (Environmental Planning)

The MCRP program requires students to earn 12 credit hours toward a planning specialization.  Of particular interest to law students are the specializations in Environmental Planning or Land Use. Certain of the law courses listed above may be used to satisfy up to six hours of these specializations. These specializations are noted above in parenthesis next to the qualifying law courses. Students with interests in other planning specializations (land development/housing or transportation, for example) may propose other sets of law courses that would qualify as planning specialization courses. Approval of these alternate courses is needed from both law and planning program coordinators.
 

Planning courses that may count toward the JD:

Students can apply 12 hours of MCRP course work toward their J.D. degree from the following City and Regional Planning courses:

  • CP 6031 Economic Analysis for Planning
  • CP 6112 Introduction to Land Use Planning
  • CP 6214 Environmental Planning Impact Assessment
  • CP 6223 Policy Tools for Environmental Management
  • CP 6241 Water Resources Planning
  • CP 6311 Introduction to Transportation Planning
  • CP 6452 Urban Development Policy
  • CP 6630 Government and Housing Markets
  • CP 6760 Negotiation, Facilitation, and Conflict Management

Neither the J.D. nor the MCRP degree will be awarded until completion of the requirements of both degree programs.
 

Program Coordinating & Advising:

Students enrolled in the dual degree program will have a faculty advisor at each institution to assist them in advising, scheduling, and curriculum decisions.  These faculty advisors will work closely with the student to ensure that s/he is making appropriate progress toward the completion of the dual degree requirements. 

Additional information about this dual degree program is available from the program is available from the program director or the program academic advisor.
 

Program Advisors

Bruce Stiftel, City & Regional Planning 
Julian Juergensmeyer, College of Law, Georgia State University